Category: Cyber Ethics

Cyberattacks are on the rise amid work from home – how to protect your business

Experienced outdoor athletes know that with winter rapidly approaching, the secret to success lies in protecting the core. That is, the body’s core temperature through layering, wicking and a host of ever-improving technical fabrics that prevent the cold, snow and ice from affecting performance. The same could be said for cybersecurity. With organizations and workers now in their ninth month of COVID-19, the time has come to prepare as the threat of cyberattacks becomes even more menacing. It will help if we can get our teams up on these systems earlier so they understand what’s possible before it happens. And lastly–and perhaps most importantly, at this very moment–it is important to remember not only how those behind attacks work but also when or why hackers do them. This requires understanding which capabilities are necessary by law, whether you use malware like Stuxnet (exploiting Iran’s nuclear facilities) or attack using code found inside sensitive software such Google Earth is internal navigation system.

People bring their personal habits, good and bad, into their professional lives. People who re-use passwords for different online shopping sites or use weak, easily remembered passwords (pets’ names, anyone?) tend to be similarly lax when creating or using enterprise passwords and databases. They have and will likely continue to click on phishing emails and engage (innocently or not) in potentially destructive practices. If they don’t do so themselves, we can expect them eventually—and more than that, sooner now if the social consequences of these failures are small enough. “When I first started writing about this topic there was a lot resistance because it sounded like paranoia,” says Michael Marwiss, CEO at Aptoide Labs, an IT security company based out Larchmont Illinois that is making plans to improve its business by taking password reuse seriously. “There’s no way somebody could create something malicious today [for example] with someone else typing away.”

For them, winterizing means ongoing formal training programs and monitoring to reduce the probability of accidental disclosures or malicious uploads. If they happen to be in sensitive positions, with access to confidential data, it means an extra layer of vigilance, and perhaps even restrictions and advanced tools like multi-factor authentication. For executives and directors, it means ensuring they are familiar and compliant with privacy and other regulations. at times such as these, there’s a significant amount that can go wrong: some people just fall victim due not knowing how this works; others misjudge what will turn up on security systems because new equipment is suddenly being manufactured without their knowledge; and still more might want to share proprietary information but don’t have time or resources to comply. When things come out right (or if we’re talking about major cyber attacks), all parties involved suffer losses beyond repair — each party feeling slighted by both sides when no one knows where those funds went or who gets reimbursed for lost work.

Experienced outdoor athletes know that with winter rapidly approaching, the secret to success lies in protecting the core. That is, the body’s core temperature through layering, wicking and a host of ever-improving technical fabrics that prevent the cold, snow and ice from affecting performance. The same could be said for cybersecurity. With organizations and workers…