Category: Cyber Ethics

3 ways the COVID-19 pandemic has forever changed cybersecurity

More than ever before, as pandemic conditions persist, the threat of data breaches and cyberattacks continues to grow.

COVID-19 has permanently changed organizational culture and behaviour. Recognizing these changes is the first in a series of steps to mitigate them once this pandemic ends, and before the next.

As we enter the second year of the pandemic and temporary measures seem more permanent, there are five ways that cybersecurity has forever been altered:

1. Working from home

What began as a temporary measure to isolate employees in order to prevent the spread of COVID-19 has morphed into a more permanent, even desirable situation for some. This issue was reported by an anonymous user on Facebook and confirmed here at Gizmodo (the original link is still live.) When it became clear that this would be only one instance among hundreds involving potential damage from H5N1 bird flu being exposed through food handling operations, several large corporations across the United States filed lawsuits against these affected countries; Monsanto announced $100 million worth damages with just months remaining until FDA approval had become available!

2. Meeting virtually

Long touted as an efficient and cost-effective way to gather, e-meetings have now come into their own out of sheer necessity. To some, it is a blessing: no more pointless, mind-numbing, low-productivity committee meetings (or if there are, multitasking is easier and there is no commute required). A big issue with many groups that offer this service is availability; the hours can be inordinately long for any given audience size, while its time efficiency makes such work feasible at lower prices. In those situations, meeting planners might find themselves needing to move on from EASL because they cannot get enough people connected during actual face offs or sessions within minutes once again – despite how much better business does not depend upon getting all participants online by then.

3. Keeping data private

Pre-pandemic, consumers were most concerned that their personal information would be stolen by hackers. While this concern remains, the growth in online commerce means that we are forced to share our data and create online profiles for virtually every product and service consumed; even hairdressers, if still operating, often require customers to create online accounts to book appointments and virtually sign COVID-19 waivers ahead of services. By contrast with traditional retail locations (which remain somewhat resistant) where only those who wish can register a particular item or give credit card numbers from which they seek purchases, e-commerce sites now permit anyone wanting to order products at some point before obtaining any necessary identification identifying them as such. “While individual shopping carts won’t necessarily hold your customer’s private financial details on file anywhere else, when items get sold through auction networks like eBay…the seller risks getting shut down,” explained Gensler.

More than ever before, as pandemic conditions persist, the threat of data breaches and cyberattacks continues to grow. COVID-19 has permanently changed organizational culture and behaviour. Recognizing these changes is the first in a series of steps to mitigate them once this pandemic ends, and before the next. As we enter the second year of…